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The complete guide to recycling & sustainability news, events and information in Pleasantville, NY


Village of Pleasantville residents may bring ALL food scraps to the Food Scrap Drop-Off Site at the DPW Recycling Center, 1 Village Lane. The site is open every Saturday, 9am–3pm. We are proud to offer this program as part of our continuing commitment to divert waste from incineration and to increase recycling!

Download a copy of our Food Scrap Recycling Guide here


WHAT IS ACCEPTED? 

•Fruits and Vegetables (remove stickers, bands, and ties)
•Meat and Poultry (bones OK)
•Fish and Shellfish (shells OK)
•Dairy Products
•Bread and Pasta
•Rice and Grains
•Eggshells
•Chips and Snacks
•Nuts and Seeds
•Leftover and Spoiled Food
•Coffee Grounds (paper filters OK)
•Tea Bags (no staples)
•Paper Towels and Napkins
•Cut Flowers
•Compostable Bags (no plastic bags)



HOW DOES IT WORK?









Collect food scraps in a countertop pail
(can be lined with a compostable bag).


HOW DO I PURCHASE THE BINS? 

A food scrap starter kit makes it easy and convenient. A starter kit includes: a 2-gallon countertop pail, a 6-gallon storage and transportation bin, and a roll of 25 compostable bags to line the countertop pail. 


Starter kits can be purchased at Village Hall, and will be available for pick up or delivery the week of Sept. 30. Cost: $25. Payment is by check or cash.

Check (payable to: Village of Pleasantville) must be mailed to or dropped off at Village Hall. Please note Food Scrap Program in memo.

Village of Pleasantville
Administrator/Clerk’s office, 3rd Floor
80 Wheeler Ave.
Pleasantville, NY 10570 
Village Hall Hours, M–F, 8:30am–4:00pm



WHAT HAPPENS TO THE FOOD SCRAPS AFTER I DROP THEM OFF? 

All collected material is made into compost at a commercial composting facility with specialized processes to break it down quickly. The compost is then sold to landscapers and garden centers. 


AM I REQUIRED TO PURCHASE A STARTER KIT?

No. Any container with a snug-fitting lid that will fit under your sink or on your kitchen counter will work for collecting the food scraps. A good size is 1 to 2.5 gallons. Suggested sizing for the storage and transportation bin is 5 to 6 gallons. 



AM I REQUIRED TO USE COMPOSTABLE BAGS?

No. You can use a compostable bag, a paper bag, or no bag at all. No plastic bags!


IS COMPOSTING MESSY OR SMELLY?

Collecting food scraps should not be any more messy or smelly than putting food scraps in your trash. The same materials are being collected – just in a different container. If this is a concern, line your pail with a compostable bag to keep everything cleaner.
 


HOW IS THIS PROGRAM DIFFERENT FROM BACKYARD COMPOSTING?

Good compost can be made in a backyard composter or in a commercial composting facility. The difference is that a backyard composter is limited to certain foods (fruits, vegetable, coffee grounds, eggshells) while a commercial composting facility can also handle meat, fish, dairy, bones, and other materials. If you already use a backyard composter, we encourage you to continue doing that. You can use this service for proteins and other foods that it can’t handle. 


WHY COMPOST?

Composting keeps food out of the waste stream, where it currently makes up a large percentage of what is sent to the county’s incinerator with the rest of our trash. With its high water content, it does not make good fuel. However, when composted, food scraps and organic waste can be turned into a soil amendment that helps grow more plants, fruits and vegetables! Compost returns valuable nutrients to the soil to help maintain soil quality and fertility.



WHAT’S NEXT?

Sign up for important updates at info@PleasantvilleRecycles.org.


QUESTIONS?

Call the DPW at 914.769.3883 (M–F, 9am–3pm) or email info@PleasantvilleRecycles.org for additional information. You can also reach PleasantvilleRecycles via Facebook and Instagram.

Store filled bags in a storage and transportation bin.

Bring your storage and transportation bin to the Food Scrap Drop-Off Site at the DPW Recycling Center.

Food Scrap Recycling

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